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Aug-14-2010 02:27printcomments

Oregon Summer Blazes into the Weekend

A Heat Advisory remains in effect from Noon Saturday to 9:00 p.m. Monday.

weather forecast
5-day weather forecast shows a strong showing by the sun. Salem-News.com

(SALEM, Ore.) - A strong ridge of high pressure will bring hot weather to the Northwest region from Corvallis, east to Hood River and north to Battleground, Washington Saturday through Monday.

High temperatures in the mid to upper 90s can be expected all weekend with some locations likely reaching 100 degrees on Sunday or Monday. The Heat Advisory will remain in effect until Monday at 9:00 p.m.

Precautionary/preparedness Actions

Hot temperatures will create a situation in which heat related illnesses are possible. Small children and animals must not be left confined in cars.

The elderly and people without access to air conditioning will be particularly vulnerable during this heat episode. Know those in your neighborhood who are elderly, young, sick or overweight. They are more likely to become victims of excessive heat and may need help.

Drink plenty of non-alcoholic fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sunshine, and check up on relatives and neighbors.

The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined. Exposure to direct sunlight can increase the heat index by as much as 15° F.

Check the contents of your emergency preparedness kit in case a power outage occurs.

If you do not have air conditioning, choose places you could go to for relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls).

Ensure that your animals’ needs for water and shade are met.

The Oregon Red Cross offers these suggestions during this extreme summer heat:

A car becomes an oven in 10 minutes. weather.com

  • Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).
  • Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
  • Eat small meals and eat more often.
  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
  • Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day.
  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.
  • Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat.
  • Take frequent breaks if you must work outdoors.
  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
  • Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.


Heat-Related Emergencies

Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that usually occur in the legs or abdomen caused by exposure to high heat and humidity and loss of fluids and electrolytes. Heat cramps are often an early sign that the body is having trouble with the heat.

Heat exhaustion typically involves the loss of body fluids through heavy sweating during strenuous exercise or physical labor in high heat and humidity.

Signs of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale or flushed skin; heavy sweating; headache; nausea; dizziness; weakness; and exhaustion.

Move the person to a cooler place. Remove or loosen tight clothing and apply cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin. Fan the person. If the person is conscious, give small amounts of cool water to drink. Make sure the person drinks slowly. Watch for changes in condition.

If the person refuses water, vomits or begins to lose consciousness, call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.

Heat stroke (also known as sunstroke) is a life-threatening condition in which a person’s temperature control system stops working and the body is unable to cool itself.

Signs of heat stroke include hot, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; vomiting; and high body temperature.

Move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the person’s body by giving care as you would for heat exhaustion. If needed, continue rapid cooling by applying ice or cold packs wrapped in a cloth to the wrists, ankles, groin, neck and armpits.

Heat stroke is life-threatening. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number immediately.




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